Tag Archives: Fame

re:verse : “The Siege of the Warwick” – Edie Sedgwick

I guess I should call this, “The Siege of The Warwick…”

but, left alone with a substantial supply of speed I forgot that I was heavily addicted to barbiturates and I started having strange compulsive behavior.

This was after I was done, well, I was shooting up every half hour, every twenty minutes on the half hour, thinking with each fresh shot I’d knock this nonsense out of my system, this physical disability I began to notice, namely convulsions, which lasted eight hours, during which I entertained myself while hanging on to, head down, hanging on to the bathroom sink, with my hind foot stomped against the drawer, trying to hold myself steady enough so I wouldn’t crack my stupid skull open.

Continue reading re:verse : “The Siege of the Warwick” – Edie Sedgwick

My-Fi: 808s and Heartbreak – Kanye West

http://consequenceofsound.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/kanye-west-808s-heartbreak.jpg?w=600&h=600

If Graduation is Fame, 808s & Heartbreak Kills. In the wake of Graduation‘s superlative Indian summer high, 808s and Heartbreak is the inevitable comedown – the crash of the coldest winter. West described this album as “Pop Art,” in its ability to merge hip-hop credibility with mainstream appeal to innovate authentic music in a way only paralleled by Pink Floyd: Welcome to heartbreak – the dark side of the moon.

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Vinyl Cut Prose: The Crossroads, Laurel Canyon + Mulholland Drive

I riffed on Laurel Canyon and Mulholland Drive into a recording device for eight minutes and forty-nine seconds: this is the verbatim transcription.

Okay, fifteen minutes. I’m at Mulholland and Laurel Canyon.

So, I guess the most fitting thing for me to do at this point would be to talk about what Laurel Canyon and Mulholland mean to me. Fifteen minutes. So we’re on the clock, and we’re twenty seconds in: so, to me, Mulholland Laurel Canyon is just The … I wanna say The Fame. Oh. I wanna say The Fame, but it is fame: it’s American fame. What is The Fame to me? Mulholland and Laurel Canyon are Hollywood. It’s Cal – it’s … we’ll figure it out together.

Laurel Canyon is the Hippie Movement, right. It’s this, y’know, makeshift cobblestone ver– y’know, sloping – It’s… this canyon. It’s a canyon. It’s a cavity. It’s a cavity; but it’s the vein, and it’s the artery at the same time. Y’know like, you get traction. Y’know Laurel Canyon is the Hippies, is the Sixties, it’s the counterculture. It’s Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison. Umm, it’s an odd counterculture. It’s very calm and weathered. And then you’ve got Mulholland, which is fame to me.

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EP 27.4 : “because you’re beautiful, drop dead.”

Fundamental Contemporary Pop premise #celebrityschadenfreude

Illustration by Speckled Sydney

If all I cared about was me, I could make a million. And that’s what they will never understand.

“It’s not that I’m rebelling. It’s that I’m just trying to find another way.”

I think something very weird’s going on now, ’cause the power that is permitted to youth is quite extraordinary. And they are sort of run by that kind of power.

Continue reading EP 27.4 : “because you’re beautiful, drop dead.”

re:verse : “Do You Know The Way to San Jose?” – Dionne Warwick, Burt Bacharach, Hal David

Good music speaks volumes… listen, look, and linger in fantastic rhythmic reality: lyrically speaking

“Do You Know the Way to San Jose,” Dionne
Warwick in Valley of the Dolls
(1968)

xo
Do you know the way to San Jose
I’ve been away so long. I may go wrong and lose my way
Do you know the way to San Jose
I’m going back to find some peace of mind in San Jose


L.A. is a great big freeway
Put a hundred down and buy a car
In a week, maybe two, they’ll make you a star
Weeks turn into years. How quick they pass
And all the stars that never were
Are parking cars and pumping gas

Continue reading re:verse : “Do You Know The Way to San Jose?” – Dionne Warwick, Burt Bacharach, Hal David